The Edict of Nantes square

With the Edict of Nantes, Henri IV granted a slightly restricted freedom of worship to the Protestants, along with about 80 strongholds, such as La Rochelle, Beauvoir-sur-Mer, Montaigu…taken away by Richelieu in the early 17th century, to prevent their being ‘a State within the State’.

  • La place de l’Édit-de-Nantes
    The Edict of Nantes square © Wikimedia Creative Commons
  • Le temple (1943), place de Gigant, quelques mois avant sa destruction
    The temple (1943), place de Gigant, a few months before its destruction

They fought hard to keep their freedom of worship until the Revocation by Louis XIV on 17 October 1685.

There used to be a temple on the site of the present garden, built by Driollet in 1855. It was destroyed by bombing on 23 September 1943.

 

Associated notes

  • Revocation of the Edict of Nantes

    Decided by Louis XIV, this revocation on October 22, 1685 led to the increased repression of Protestants (death sentences and sentences to row the galleys, forced conversion, etc.). It amplified...
  • The Edict of Nantes (1598)

    This was Henri IV’s major achievement : the terms of this edict ensured the peaceful coexistence of Catholics and Protestants and brought a stop to all hostilities in France after 36 years...

Associated tours

  • Walk in the Nantes protestant

    A protestant tour in the city of Nantes: discover 11 emblematic places of the presence of Protestants in the city of Nantes.